billcomptontb:

"Will you be back tomorrow?"

(Source: benwarlow)

knight-enchanter:

This month, PC Gamer UK’s cover feature is DA:I. They got exclusive access to the game for an extensive, hands-on preview.
The digital copy came through for subscribers today. Subscribe here, or get it via the iTunes store or Google Play.
ElitePinecone of the BSN was kind enough to share some of the best bits on the BSN. I’ve quoted it below for those of you who don’t want to access the forums:

About Skyhold:
"It’s detailed, cavernous, but more importantly, there’s more stuff you can do in Skyhold than on Commander Shepard’s ship. Past the tavern, stables, courtyard, kitchen, and dungeon (for imprisoning people, not slaying rats, I learn), I step to the War Table. Here, a dozen or so operation markers populate a world map: scouting missions, a task to gain the friendship of the dwarven kingdom of Orzammar or to recruit an arcanist. You complete these micro-quests entirely through the menu, and they grant modest benefits: gold, loot, resources, or adding more ‘agents’ who join the Inquisition."
"… part of playing Inquisitor means decorating Skyhold manually: everything from the windows, throne, banner, and heraldry to the drapes can be swapped in a menu."
There’s also a long section on how the Inquisition can “pass judgement” on certain people as a result of quests - the example they gave was dealing with a barbarian tribe [Knight-Enchanter’s note: I would guess these are Avvar!] after defeating their leader in battle. The judgement sequences come after some story events and offer the player a way to reflect on what just happened.
"Laidlaw underlines the value on getting players to look backward rather than simply anticipating the next quest. “Inquisition, moreso than many of our other games, takes a moment to just ask ‘how you feeling?’ and have characters dig into why you did what you did. And to try to understand the Inquisitor’s mind. And they’re some of my favourite moments in the game,” he says."

"Some operations, like this one, are instantly resolved, but others ask you to pick which of your three advisors – Josephine (political), Cullen (military), or Leliana (spying) – is the right fit for the job, making them temporarily unavailable. You can visit with all three of these support characters inside Skyhold.


Also nestled into the War Table (but separated from operations) are Inquisition perks, which draw on influence that you gain from exploring Thedas and completing quests. (If power is “Inquisition gold,” as Darrah puts it, influence is Inquisition XP, effectively.) There are four perk types: Forces, Secrets, Connections, and simply ‘Inquisition’, the first three of which are tied to the aforementioned advisors. A Forces perk might increase your potion capacity by four; a Secrets perk might increase the XP you earn from picking up codex entries; one Connections perk grants better merchant offers on rare items. Skyhold changes as a reflection of which perks you favour, although I wasn’t told how.

knight-enchanter:

This month, PC Gamer UK’s cover feature is DA:I. They got exclusive access to the game for an extensive, hands-on preview.

The digital copy came through for subscribers today. Subscribe here, or get it via the iTunes store or Google Play.

ElitePinecone of the BSN was kind enough to share some of the best bits on the BSN. I’ve quoted it below for those of you who don’t want to access the forums:

About Skyhold:

"It’s detailed, cavernous, but more importantly, there’s more stuff you can do in Skyhold than on Commander Shepard’s ship. Past the tavern, stables, courtyard, kitchen, and dungeon (for imprisoning people, not slaying rats, I learn), I step to the War Table. Here, a dozen or so operation markers populate a world map: scouting missions, a task to gain the friendship of the dwarven kingdom of Orzammar or to recruit an arcanist. You complete these micro-quests entirely through the menu, and they grant modest benefits: gold, loot, resources, or adding more ‘agents’ who join the Inquisition."

"… part of playing Inquisitor means decorating Skyhold manually: everything from the windows, throne, banner, and heraldry to the drapes can be swapped in a menu."

There’s also a long section on how the Inquisition can “pass judgement” on certain people as a result of quests - the example they gave was dealing with a barbarian tribe [Knight-Enchanter’s note: I would guess these are Avvar!] after defeating their leader in battle. The judgement sequences come after some story events and offer the player a way to reflect on what just happened.

"Laidlaw underlines the value on getting players to look backward rather than simply anticipating the next quest. “Inquisition, moreso than many of our other games, takes a moment to just ask ‘how you feeling?’ and have characters dig into why you did what you did. And to try to understand the Inquisitor’s mind. And they’re some of my favourite moments in the game,” he says."
"Some operations, like this one, are instantly resolved, but others ask you to pick which of your three advisors – Josephine (political), Cullen (military), or Leliana (spying) – is the right fit for the job, making them temporarily unavailable. You can visit with all three of these support characters inside Skyhold.
Also nestled into the War Table (but separated from operations) are Inquisition perks, which draw on influence that you gain from exploring Thedas and completing quests. (If power is “Inquisition gold,” as Darrah puts it, influence is Inquisition XP, effectively.) There are four perk types: Forces, Secrets, Connections, and simply ‘Inquisition’, the first three of which are tied to the aforementioned advisors. A Forces perk might increase your potion capacity by four; a Secrets perk might increase the XP you earn from picking up codex entries; one Connections perk grants better merchant offers on rare items. Skyhold changes as a reflection of which perks you favour, although I wasn’t told how.

(via dragonaging)

(Source: emissarydeatons)

"The real me is inside here somewhere just waiting to get out and you can make that happen and once the curse is broken I’ll be just like anybody else." "What if the curse doesn’t get broken? What if the curse can never be broken?"

(Source: itstimetokilltheturtle, via itstimetokilltheturtle)

(Source: aisalynn)

(Source: emmasneverland)

(Source: neymalia)

(Source: xaview)

(Source: fassys)

(Source: heathledgers)